While living in New York City, Man Ray (more here) with his friend Marcel Duchamp, formed the American branch of the Dada movement, which began in Europe as a radical rejection of traditional art. He co-founded the group of modern artists called Others.

Shortly before World War II, Man Ray returned to the United States and settled in Los Angeles from 1940 until 1951. He was disappointed that he was recognized only for his photography in America and not for the filmmaking, painting, sculpture, and other media in which he worked. In 1951 Man Ray returned to Paris. He concentrated primarily on painting until his death in 1976.

Born in Philadelphia, Emmanuel Radnitsky grew up in New Jersey and became a commercial artist in New York in the 1910s. He began to sign his name Man Ray (more here) in 1912, although his family did not change its surname to Ray until the 1920s. He initially taught himself photography in order to reproduce his own works of art, which included paintings and mixed media. In 1921 he moved to Paris and set up a photography studio to support himself. There he began to make photograms, which he called “Rayographs.” In the 1920s, he also began making moving pictures. Man Ray’s four completed films—Return to Reason, Emak Bakia, Starfish, and Mystery of the Chateau—were all highly creative, non-narrative explorations of the possibilities of the medium.

Regarded as one of the greatest photographers of his time, Henri Cartier-Bresson (more photos by Bresson) was a shy Frenchman who elevated “snap shooting” to the level of a refined and disciplined art. His sharp-shooter’s ability to catch “the decisive moment,” his precise eye for design, his self-effacing methods of work, and his literate comments about the theory and practice of photography made him a legendary figure among contemporary photojournalists.

Regarded as one of the greatest photographers of his time, Henri Cartier-Bresson (more photos by Bresson) was a shy Frenchman who elevated “snap shooting” to the level of a refined and disciplined art. His sharp-shooter’s ability to catch “the decisive moment,” his precise eye for design, his self-effacing methods of work, and his literate comments about the theory and practice of photography made him a legendary figure among contemporary photojournalists.

Henry Clarke (more of his work) was a fabulous fashion photographer of 1950’s and 1960’s. When you think 50’s-60’s elegance you visualize his photos! He worked for American, Frech and British Vouge from 1950’s till late 70’s. Born in Loas Angeles in 1918, Henry Clarke, discovered his calling in 1945 whilst working as an accessorist at Clode Nast in NY. 

Henry Clarke (more of his work) was a fabulous fashion photographer of 1950’s and 1960’s. When you think 50’s-60’s elegance you visualize his photos! He worked for American, Frech and British Vouge from 1950’s till late 70’s. Born in Loas Angeles in 1918, Henry Clarke, discovered his calling in 1945 whilst working as an accessorist at Clode Nast in NY. 

Dolores Costello by Alfred Cheney Johnston sometime in 1920’s
Alfred Cheney Johnston was born in New York City on April 8, 1885. He started experimenting with photography by taking portraits of friends and fellow students attending his art classes at National Academy of Design in New York City where he studied to be an illustrator. Alfred applied the knowledge and principles he’d absorbed from his painting classes to his portrait photography. Johnston’s photographs were indeed very painterly and throughout his life many would compare his photographic technique to that of fine art painting.
Dolores Costello was once known as the Goddess of the Silent Screen but is probably best remembered today as Drew Barrymore's grandmother. Dolores appeared in numerous pictures throughout the 1910s and the early 1920s, mostly with her father - Maurice Costello and sister - Helena Costello. She later appeared on the New York stage with her sister in “George White Scandals of 1924”. They were then signed by Warners Bros. where Dolores met future husband John Barrymore
judywald:

Reminiscient of Olive Thomas, somehow.

Dolores Costello by Alfred Cheney Johnston sometime in 1920’s

Alfred Cheney Johnston was born in New York City on April 8, 1885. He started experimenting with photography by taking portraits of friends and fellow students attending his art classes at National Academy of Design in New York City where he studied to be an illustratorAlfred applied the knowledge and principles he’d absorbed from his painting classes to his portrait photography. Johnston’s photographs were indeed very painterly and throughout his life many would compare his photographic technique to that of fine art painting.

Dolores Costello was once known as the Goddess of the Silent Screen but is probably best remembered today as Drew Barrymore's grandmother. Dolores appeared in numerous pictures throughout the 1910s and the early 1920s, mostly with her father - Maurice Costello and sister - Helena Costello. She later appeared on the New York stage with her sister in “George White Scandals of 1924”. They were then signed by Warners Bros. where Dolores met future husband John Barrymore

judywald:

Reminiscient of Olive Thomas, somehow.

(via behindthesnapshot-deactivated20)

Martin Munkacsi (more of his work), born in Koloszvár, Hungary in 1896, published his first sports photos in 1921 and in 1927 moved to Berlin, where he worked for Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, Koralle, Uhu, Die Dame, Vu, Modern Photography and other international magazines. By the time he immigrated to the USA in 1934, he had revolutionized fashion photography. He worked under contract for Harper’s Bazaar, published works in Life to great acclaim and photographed the influential series “How Americans Live” for Ladies’ Home Journal. Munkacsi also worked as an advertising photographer and as a camera man for film productions. Largely forgotten, he died in New York in 1963.

Martin Munkacsi (more of his work), born in Koloszvár, Hungary in 1896, published his first sports photos in 1921 and in 1927 moved to Berlin, where he worked for Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, Koralle, Uhu, Die Dame, Vu, Modern Photography and other international magazines. By the time he immigrated to the USA in 1934, he had revolutionized fashion photography. He worked under contract for Harper’s Bazaar, published works in Life to great acclaim and photographed the influential series “How Americans Live” for Ladies’ Home Journal. Munkacsi also worked as an advertising photographer and as a camera man for film productions. Largely forgotten, he died in New York in 1963.

More of Martin Munkacsi work.
suddenfabulosity:

“Peignoir in a soft breeze” by Martin Munkácsi. 1936.

More of Martin Munkacsi work.

suddenfabulosity:

“Peignoir in a soft breeze” by Martin Munkácsi. 1936.

More of Martin Munkacsi work
so30s:

 The Puddle Jumper 1934
 by Martin Munkacsi
via LE CLOWN LYRIQUE

More of Martin Munkacsi work

so30s:

 The Puddle Jumper 1934

by Martin Munkacsi

via LE CLOWN LYRIQUE

theconstantbuzz:

© Wingate Paine1915-1987


In his day  Wingate Paine created an icon of the 1960s Sexual Revolution. Though innocent by today’s standards, Paine’s photography pushed the limits of what was considered acceptable art photography. Paine viewed his models with appreciation and respect, as well as desire. Paine’s women stand on the threshold of 60s’ feminism. One foot remains in the sexist realm of men (as expressed in the text of Fellini), while the other foot enters a more empowered women’s sphere (given voice by Sagan). 
Paine succeeded in his ambition to produce a modern erotic classic, true to his time.

theconstantbuzz:

© Wingate Paine1915-1987

In his day  Wingate Paine created an icon of the 1960s Sexual Revolution. Though innocent by today’s standards, Paine’s photography pushed the limits of what was considered acceptable art photography. Paine viewed his models with appreciation and respect, as well as desire. Paine’s women stand on the threshold of 60s’ feminism. One foot remains in the sexist realm of men (as expressed in the text of Fellini), while the other foot enters a more empowered women’s sphere (given voice by Sagan). 

Paine succeeded in his ambition to produce a modern erotic classic, true to his time.

britewings:

“Known as the Motorcycle Queen of Miami, Bessie Stringfield started riding when she was 16. She was the first African-American woman to travel cross-country solo, and she did it at age 19 in 1929, riding a 1928 Indian Scout. Bessie traveled through all of the lower 48 states during the ’30s and ’40s at a time when the country was rife with prejudice and hatred. She later rode in Europe, Brazil, and Haiti and during World War II she served as one of the few motorcycle despatch riders for the United States military.”
- http://demenshea.com

britewings:

“Known as the Motorcycle Queen of Miami, Bessie Stringfield started riding when she was 16. She was the first African-American woman to travel cross-country solo, and she did it at age 19 in 1929, riding a 1928 Indian Scout. Bessie traveled through all of the lower 48 states during the ’30s and ’40s at a time when the country was rife with prejudice and hatred. She later rode in Europe, Brazil, and Haiti and during World War II she served as one of the few motorcycle despatch riders for the United States military.”

http://demenshea.com

(via britewings-deactivated20140409)