Josephine Baker (more photos of Josephine)  Overcoming the limitations imposed by the color of her skin, she became one of the world’s most versatile entertainers, performing on stage, screen and recordings. Josephine was decorated for her undercover work for the French Resistance during World War II. She was a civil rights activist. She refused to perform for segregated audiences and integrated the Las Vegas nightclubs. She adopted twelve children from around the world whom she called her “Rainbow Tribe.”

Josephine Baker (more photos of Josephine)  Overcoming the limitations imposed by the color of her skin, she became one of the world’s most versatile entertainers, performing on stage, screen and recordings. Josephine was decorated for her undercover work for the French Resistance during World War II. She was a civil rights activist. She refused to perform for segregated audiences and integrated the Las Vegas nightclubs. She adopted twelve children from around the world whom she called her “Rainbow Tribe.”

(Source: unitedartists)

vintagegal:

Alla Nazimova

Alla Nazimova was a legend of the Russian and American stages in the early part of the 20st century who went on to star in numerous Hollywood films. As a child, Nazimova studied music at the St. Petersburg Conservatory and at Odessa where she became an excellent violinist. Later she studied acting with Stanislavsky before emigrating to the U.S. in 1905 to work on Broadway where she became one of the best interpreter’s of Ibsen’s work. In 1916, Nazimova made her screen debut. Frequently she would produce and her husband would direct her films. Such collaborative efforts created bold and provocative films that bordered on surrealism. In 1925, Nazimova left films to resume her theatrical career; during the 1940s, she returned to film in character roles. 

vintagegal:

Alla Nazimova

Alla Nazimova was a legend of the Russian and American stages in the early part of the 20st century who went on to star in numerous Hollywood films. As a child, Nazimova studied music at the St. Petersburg Conservatory and at Odessa where she became an excellent violinist. Later she studied acting with Stanislavsky before emigrating to the U.S. in 1905 to work on Broadway where she became one of the best interpreter’s of Ibsen’s work. In 1916, Nazimova made her screen debut. Frequently she would produce and her husband would direct her films. Such collaborative efforts created bold and provocative films that bordered on surrealism. In 1925, Nazimova left films to resume her theatrical career; during the 1940s, she returned to film in character roles. 

thefindesiecle:


Bandit’s Roost (1888), by Jacob Riis, from “How the Other Half Lives.” Bandit’s Roost, at 59½ Mulberry Street (Mulberry Bend), was the most crime-ridden, dangerous part of all New York City.

[via thedreambeforetheringthatwokeme]

thefindesiecle:

Bandit’s Roost (1888), by Jacob Riis, from “How the Other Half Lives.” Bandit’s Roost, at 59½ Mulberry Street (Mulberry Bend), was the most crime-ridden, dangerous part of all New York City.

[via thedreambeforetheringthatwokeme]

(via rubyredglitterpumps-deactivated)

Jazz Portrait, Harlem 1958
One of the most significant jazz portraits taken in the 20th century, first published in Esquire magazine January 1959; This was Art Kane’s first assignment as a professional photographer. The photo includes some of the big names of Jazz: Art Blakey, Sonny Rollins, Thelonius Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, Count Basie.

Jazz Portrait, Harlem 1958

One of the most significant jazz portraits taken in the 20th century, first published in Esquire magazine January 1959; This was Art Kane’s first assignment as a professional photographer. The photo includes some of the big names of Jazz: Art Blakey, Sonny Rollins, Thelonius Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, Count Basie.

Clara Gordon Bow (July 29, 1905 – September 27, 1965) was an American actress born and raised in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, who rose to stardom in the silent film era of the 1920s. Her high spirits and acting artistry made her the quintessential flapper and the film “It” brought her global fame. Bow came to personify the roaring twenties and is described as its leading sex symbol.

Clara Gordon Bow (July 29, 1905 – September 27, 1965) was an American actress born and raised in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, who rose to stardom in the silent film era of the 1920s. Her high spirits and acting artistry made her the quintessential flapper and the film “It” brought her global fame. Bow came to personify the roaring twenties and is described as its leading sex symbol.

Alphonse Gabriel “Al” Capone (January 17, 1899 – January 25, 1947) was an American gangster who led a Prohibition-era crime syndicate. Known as the “Capones”, the group was dedicated to smuggling and bootlegging liquor, and other illegal activities such as prostitution, in Chicago from the early 1920s to 1931.
Capone became the king of Chicago, and basically controlled the city during the Prohibition Era. His most famous move as a gangster was the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, where he eliminated all of his enemies in 1929. No one was able to take-down Capone until Elliot Ness and his “untouchables” got him on charges of tax evasion which sentenced him to 11 years in prison. He was originally sent to a federal prison in Atlanta, but was later transferred to Alcatraz two years later. It is said that Capone didn’t adjust well to Alcatraz at all, completely breaking him down to the point of insanity.

Alphonse Gabriel “Al” Capone (January 17, 1899 – January 25, 1947) was an American gangster who led a Prohibition-era crime syndicate. Known as the “Capones”, the group was dedicated to smuggling and bootlegging liquor, and other illegal activities such as prostitution, in Chicago from the early 1920s to 1931.

Capone became the king of Chicago, and basically controlled the city during the Prohibition Era. His most famous move as a gangster was the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, where he eliminated all of his enemies in 1929. No one was able to take-down Capone until Elliot Ness and his “untouchables” got him on charges of tax evasion which sentenced him to 11 years in prison. He was originally sent to a federal prison in Atlanta, but was later transferred to Alcatraz two years later. It is said that Capone didn’t adjust well to Alcatraz at all, completely breaking him down to the point of insanity.

Child Labour Photographs of Lewis Hine.
The Factory: Young cigar makers in Engelhardt & Co. Three boys looked under 14. Labor leaders told me in busy times many small boys and girls were employed. Youngsters all smoke. Tampa, Florida
From 1908 to 1912, Hine took his camera across America to photograph children as young as three years old working for long hours, often under dangerous conditions, in factories, mines, and fields. Some of his images, such as the young girl in the mill glimpsing out the window, are among the most famous photographs ever taken.

Child Labour Photographs of Lewis Hine.

The Factory: Young cigar makers in Engelhardt & Co. Three boys looked under 14. Labor leaders told me in busy times many small boys and girls were employed. Youngsters all smoke. Tampa, Florida

From 1908 to 1912, Hine took his camera across America to photograph children as young as three years old working for long hours, often under dangerous conditions, in factories, mines, and fields. Some of his images, such as the young girl in the mill glimpsing out the window, are among the most famous photographs ever taken.

  ”The Lone Pine” by Anne W. Brigman 1908.
This image captures the essence of the Photo-Secession movement which she helped lead. Many of her most famous photos, which were taken between 1900 and 1920 depict nude women in natural contexts. Her work helped to promote photography as a fine art.  The image defies cultural norms accepted conventions, but it is organic and natural at the same time.

  ”The Lone Pine” by Anne W. Brigman 1908.

This image captures the essence of the Photo-Secession movement which she helped lead. Many of her most famous photos, which were taken between 1900 and 1920 depict nude women in natural contexts. Her work helped to promote photography as a fine art.  The image defies cultural norms accepted conventions, but it is organic and natural at the same time.

Josephine Baker famous singer & dancer in her “Girdle of Bananas.” 1926. First seen in her debut revue at the Folies Bergère: La Folie du Jour, 1926-27
She lived at a time of severe oppression of the blacks. At age 13 she ran away and went on a tour to Paris. In France Baker was embraced despite her color and her dancing style made her the talk of Europe.The Stork Club refused to serve her because she was black. In 1963 Baker spoke to the crowd with Martin Luther King at the Lincoln Memorial at March on Washington.

Josephine Baker famous singer & dancer in her “Girdle of Bananas.” 1926. First seen in her debut revue at the Folies Bergère: La Folie du Jour, 1926-27

She lived at a time of severe oppression of the blacks. At age 13 she ran away and went on a tour to Paris. In France Baker was embraced despite her color and her dancing style made her the talk of Europe.The Stork Club refused to serve her because she was black. In 1963 Baker spoke to the crowd with Martin Luther King at the Lincoln Memorial at March on Washington.

Child Labour Photographs of Lewis Hine. 
The Mill: Some boys and girls were so small they had to climb up on to the spinning frame to mend broken threads and to put back the empty bobbins. Bibb Mill No. 1. Macon, Georgia.
From 1908 to 1912, Hine took his camera across America to photograph children as young as three years old working for long hours, often under dangerous conditions, in factories, mines, and fields. Some of his images, such as the young girl in the mill glimpsing out the window, are among the most famous photographs ever taken.

Child Labour Photographs of Lewis Hine

The Mill: Some boys and girls were so small they had to climb up on to the spinning frame to mend broken threads and to put back the empty bobbins. Bibb Mill No. 1. Macon, Georgia.

From 1908 to 1912, Hine took his camera across America to photograph children as young as three years old working for long hours, often under dangerous conditions, in factories, mines, and fields. Some of his images, such as the young girl in the mill glimpsing out the window, are among the most famous photographs ever taken.