Between 1917 and 1937, Alfred Stieglitz (more) shot over 300 portraits of Georgia O’Keefe (and he was married to her). Stieglitz believed a portrait needs to be more than just the face to portray the subject’s overall experience.

"Stieglitz had a very sharp eye for what he wanted to say with the camera… His idea of a portrait was not just one picture. His dream was to start with a child at birth and photograph that child in all of its activities as it grew to be a person and on throughout its adult life. As a portrait it would be a photographic diary." -Georgia O’Keefe

The last photo of Georgias hands was sold for $1,470,000 in 2006. And is one of the most expensive photographs sold.

An American photographer, born in 1881, Alfred Stieglitz (more) was an influential photographer who spent his life fighting for the recognition of photography as a valid art form. He was a pioneering photographer, editor and gallery owner who played pivotal role in defining and shaping modernism in the United States. He took pictures in a time when photography was considered as only a scientific curiosity and not an art. As the controversy over the art value of photography became widespread, Stieglitz began to fight for the recognition of his chosen medium. This battle would last his whole life.

Born in Philadelphia, Emmanuel Radnitsky grew up in New Jersey and became a commercial artist in New York in the 1910s. He began to sign his name Man Ray (more here) in 1912, although his family did not change its surname to Ray until the 1920s. He initially taught himself photography in order to reproduce his own works of art, which included paintings and mixed media. In 1921 he moved to Paris and set up a photography studio to support himself. There he began to make photograms, which he called “Rayographs.” In the 1920s, he also began making moving pictures. Man Ray’s four completed films—Return to Reason, Emak Bakia, Starfish, and Mystery of the Chateau—were all highly creative, non-narrative explorations of the possibilities of the medium.

Charles Ebbets by Charles C. Ebbets, 1932.
Daredevil photographer Charles Ebbets (1905-1978) might even awe today’s extreme photographers with his dizzying shots. Snapping his classic shots from the same dangerous heights as his subjects, Ebbets published 300 photos in the New York Herald Tribune. Ebbets also worked as a pilot, auto racer, wrestler and hunter. He was prizefighter Jack Dempsey’s official staff photographer.

Charles Ebbets by Charles C. Ebbets, 1932.

Daredevil photographer Charles Ebbets (1905-1978) might even awe today’s extreme photographers with his dizzying shots. Snapping his classic shots from the same dangerous heights as his subjects, Ebbets published 300 photos in the New York Herald Tribune. Ebbets also worked as a pilot, auto racer, wrestler and hunter. He was prizefighter Jack Dempsey’s official staff photographer.