An American photographer, born in 1881, Alfred Stieglitz (more) was an influential photographer who spent his life fighting for the recognition of photography as a valid art form. He was a pioneering photographer, editor and gallery owner who played pivotal role in defining and shaping modernism in the United States. He took pictures in a time when photography was considered as only a scientific curiosity and not an art. As the controversy over the art value of photography became widespread, Stieglitz began to fight for the recognition of his chosen medium. This battle would last his whole life.

Eugene Atget (1857 - 1927) (More of his work here)

Another great photographer, Ansel Adams (1902-84), writing in 1931, said: “The charm of Atget lies not in the mastery of the plates and papers of his time, nor in the quaintness of costume, architecture and humanity as revealed in his pictures, but in his equitable and intimate point of view… The Atget prints are direct and emotionally clean records of a rare and subtle perception, and represent perhaps the earliest expression of true photographic art.”

Eugene Atget (1857 - 1927) (more of his work here) was one of the first photographers who documented the streets of Paris. Atget arrived in the city from Bordeaux in 1896 at the age of 40. Two years later he decided to devote himself to photography. His writings on the subject indicate that right from the start he wanted to collect images of everything he thought “artistic or picturesque in and around Paris.” Atget’s work is unique on two levels. He was the maker of a great visual catalogue of the fruits of French culture, as it survived in and near Paris in the first quarter of this century. He was in addition a photographer of such authority and originality that his work remains a bench mark against which much of the most sophisticated contemporary photography measures itself.

The pictures that he made in the service of this concept are seductively and deceptively simple, wholly poised, reticent, dense with experience, mysterious, and true.

theconstantbuzz:

© Israëlis Bidermanas

aka Izis (b Marijampole, Lithuania, 17 Jan 1911; d Paris, 16 May 1980). French photographer of Lithuanian birth. He was apprenticed to a portrait photographer at the age of 13, learning techniques of soft focus and retouching against which he later rebelled as untruthful. He emigrated to Paris in 1930 and in 1934 opened a studio where he produced portraits. During World War II he was a member of the Resistance, photographing his comrades and working as a photo researcher. After the war he became a French citizen (1946) and worked as a freelance photographer before joining the staff of Paris-Match in 1949. He remained with the magazine for 20 years, specializing in photographs of painters, poets and writers. He also photographed Paris and the life within it, and throughout his life he retained a strong fascination for the city. On leaving Paris-Match in 1969 he worked as a freelance photographer until his death.

theconstantbuzz:

© Israëlis Bidermanas

aka Izis (b Marijampole, Lithuania, 17 Jan 1911; d Paris, 16 May 1980). French photographer of Lithuanian birth. He was apprenticed to a portrait photographer at the age of 13, learning techniques of soft focus and retouching against which he later rebelled as untruthful. He emigrated to Paris in 1930 and in 1934 opened a studio where he produced portraits. During World War II he was a member of the Resistance, photographing his comrades and working as a photo researcher. After the war he became a French citizen (1946) and worked as a freelance photographer before joining the staff of Paris-Match in 1949. He remained with the magazine for 20 years, specializing in photographs of painters, poets and writers. He also photographed Paris and the life within it, and throughout his life he retained a strong fascination for the city. On leaving Paris-Match in 1969 he worked as a freelance photographer until his death.

Les Enfants de la Place Hebert by Robert Doisneau, 1957 
French photographer Robert Doisneau captured profoundly poignant, iconic images of the 20th century for Life magazine and Paris Vogue. During WWII, Doisneau worked for the Resistance and photographed the Occupation and Liberation ofParis. He photographed many French artists including Picasso and holds Prix Kodak and Prix Niepce awards. In 1973, a biographic film was made about him. Major retrospectives have been held on his work in Europe and the U.S.

Les Enfants de la Place Hebert by Robert Doisneau, 1957 

French photographer Robert Doisneau captured profoundly poignant, iconic images of the 20th century for Life magazine and Paris Vogue. During WWII, Doisneau worked for the Resistance and photographed the Occupation and Liberation ofParis. He photographed many French artists including Picasso and holds Prix Kodak and Prix Niepce awards. In 1973, a biographic film was made about him. Major retrospectives have been held on his work in Europe and the U.S.

Paris by Robert Doisneau, 1950
French photographer Robert Doisneau captured profoundly poignant, iconic images of the 20th century for Life magazine and Paris Vogue. During WWII, Doisneau worked for the Resistance and photographed the Occupation and Liberation ofParis. He photographed many French artists including Picasso and holds Prix Kodak and Prix Niepce awards. In 1973, a biographic film was made about him. Major retrospectives have been held on his work in Europe and the U.S.

Paris by Robert Doisneau, 1950

French photographer Robert Doisneau captured profoundly poignant, iconic images of the 20th century for Life magazine and Paris Vogue. During WWII, Doisneau worked for the Resistance and photographed the Occupation and Liberation ofParis. He photographed many French artists including Picasso and holds Prix Kodak and Prix Niepce awards. In 1973, a biographic film was made about him. Major retrospectives have been held on his work in Europe and the U.S.

Rock ‘n’ Roll sur les Quais de Paris by Paul Almasy, 1950(?)
The joi de vive of a couple cavorting by the banks of the Sein was captured by Paul Almasy (1906 – 2003),a pioneer of photojournalism. A native of Hungary, Almasy trekked the globe for six decades, amassing 120,000 photos in an exceptionally detailed archive of 20th century history. Stressing content over form in order to educate viewers, Almasy’s photos still exemplify artistic excellence.

Rock ‘n’ Roll sur les Quais de Paris by Paul Almasy, 1950(?)

The joi de vive of a couple cavorting by the banks of the Sein was captured by Paul Almasy (1906 – 2003),a pioneer of photojournalism. A native of Hungary, Almasy trekked the globe for six decades, amassing 120,000 photos in an exceptionally detailed archive of 20th century history. Stressing content over form in order to educate viewers, Almasy’s photos still exemplify artistic excellence.

 “Kiss by the Hotel de Ville”  aka The Kiss on the Sidewalk (Le Baiser du trottoir)
"The marvels of daily life are exciting; no movie director can arrange the unexpected that you find in the street."
Robert Doisneau liked to refer to himself as a “pecheur d’images,” a fisher of images.  He immersed himself in his surroundings where he waited to catch the right shot.  As one of the most famous French photographers of his day, Doisneau relied on his intuition rather than rational thinking.  He took pictures based on his instinct at the moment they occurred.In 1950 he included one of his photographs, The Kiss by the Hotel de Ville, in Life magazine.  The photograph of a man and woman kissing on a populated street in Paris has become his most famous works.  Not only does it represent love and romance, it also defines Paris as the city of love.  The photograph along with the article has become a symbol for those around the world.
P.S. The couple in the picture was actor-models and in 1988, the models did not like the fact that the Kiss became a popular icon and sued Doisneau. Fortunately, the claims failed but his name became mud in his last years.

 “Kiss by the Hotel de Ville”  aka The Kiss on the Sidewalk (Le Baiser du trottoir)

"The marvels of daily life are exciting; no movie director can arrange the unexpected that you find in the street."

Robert Doisneau liked to refer to himself as a “pecheur d’images,” a fisher of images.  He immersed himself in his surroundings where he waited to catch the right shot.  As one of the most famous French photographers of his day, Doisneau relied on his intuition rather than rational thinking.  He took pictures based on his instinct at the moment they occurred.In 1950 he included one of his photographs, The Kiss by the Hotel de Ville, in Life magazine.  The photograph of a man and woman kissing on a populated street in Paris has become his most famous works.  Not only does it represent love and romance, it also defines Paris as the city of love.  The photograph along with the article has become a symbol for those around the world.

P.S. The couple in the picture was actor-models and in 1988, the models did not like the fact that the Kiss became a popular icon and sued Doisneau. Fortunately, the claims failed but his name became mud in his last years.