In 1915, Man Ray (more here) had his first one-man show of paintings and drawings. His first proto-Dada object, an assemblage titled “Self-Portrait”, was exhibited the following year. He produced his first significant photographs in 1918.

Also found a copy of Man Ray Dada essay on-line for you to enjoy. Although if reading anything by him I would strongly suggest his essay ”To Be Continued, Unnoticed” that has my favourite quote by Man Ray ”There is no progress in art, any more than there is progress in making love. There are simply different ways of doing it.” Spot on, right?

While living in New York City, Man Ray (more here) with his friend Marcel Duchamp, formed the American branch of the Dada movement, which began in Europe as a radical rejection of traditional art. He co-founded the group of modern artists called Others.

Shortly before World War II, Man Ray returned to the United States and settled in Los Angeles from 1940 until 1951. He was disappointed that he was recognized only for his photography in America and not for the filmmaking, painting, sculpture, and other media in which he worked. In 1951 Man Ray returned to Paris. He concentrated primarily on painting until his death in 1976.

Born in Philadelphia, Emmanuel Radnitsky grew up in New Jersey and became a commercial artist in New York in the 1910s. He began to sign his name Man Ray (more here) in 1912, although his family did not change its surname to Ray until the 1920s. He initially taught himself photography in order to reproduce his own works of art, which included paintings and mixed media. In 1921 he moved to Paris and set up a photography studio to support himself. There he began to make photograms, which he called “Rayographs.” In the 1920s, he also began making moving pictures. Man Ray’s four completed films—Return to Reason, Emak Bakia, Starfish, and Mystery of the Chateau—were all highly creative, non-narrative explorations of the possibilities of the medium.

Eugene Atget (1857 - 1927) (more of his work here) was one of the first photographers who documented the streets of Paris. Atget arrived in the city from Bordeaux in 1896 at the age of 40. Two years later he decided to devote himself to photography. His writings on the subject indicate that right from the start he wanted to collect images of everything he thought “artistic or picturesque in and around Paris.” Atget’s work is unique on two levels. He was the maker of a great visual catalogue of the fruits of French culture, as it survived in and near Paris in the first quarter of this century. He was in addition a photographer of such authority and originality that his work remains a bench mark against which much of the most sophisticated contemporary photography measures itself.

The pictures that he made in the service of this concept are seductively and deceptively simple, wholly poised, reticent, dense with experience, mysterious, and true.

Ansel Adams’  passion for the land wasn’t limited to vistas he framed through the lens. In 1936, he accompanied his photos to Washington to lobby for the preservation of the Kings Canyon area in California. Sure enough, he was successful, and it was declared a national park.

Brashly declaring photography to be “a blazing poetry of the real,” Ansel Adams eschewed manipulations, claiming they were simply derivative of other art forms. Instead, he preached the value of “pure photography.” In an era when handheld point-and-shoot cameras were quickly becoming the norm, Adams and other landscape photographers clung to their bulky, old-fashioned large-format cameras. Ultimately, Adams’ pictures turned photography into fine art.

Nowadays a lot of his works are constantly featured in annual calendars

theconstantbuzz:

© Henri Cartier-Bresson

He (more photos by Bresson) was born in 1908, in Chanteloupe, France, of prosperous middle-class parents. He owned a Box Brownie as a boy, using it for taking holiday snapshots, and later experimented with a 3 X 4 view camera. But he was also interested in painting and studied for two years in a Paris studio. This early training in art helped develop the subtle and sensitive eye for composition, which was one of his greatest assets as a photographer.

theconstantbuzz:

© Henri Cartier-Bresson

He (more photos by Bresson) was born in 1908, in Chanteloupe, France, of prosperous middle-class parents. He owned a Box Brownie as a boy, using it for taking holiday snapshots, and later experimented with a 3 X 4 view camera. But he was also interested in painting and studied for two years in a Paris studio. This early training in art helped develop the subtle and sensitive eye for composition, which was one of his greatest assets as a photographer.

Clara Bow (more photos of Bow) survived a brutal childhood, marred by poverty and her mother’s severe mental illness. Bow found comfort in the movies and dreams of stardom, especially after winning a beauty contest that gave her a small movie part as a prize and took of her career. Typifying the flapper girl image, Bow enjoyed a life style beyond her means. She tore around Hollywood in a bright red convertible with pet chows dyed to match her flaming red hair. 

Clara Bow (more photos of Bow) survived a brutal childhood, marred by poverty and her mother’s severe mental illness. Bow found comfort in the movies and dreams of stardom, especially after winning a beauty contest that gave her a small movie part as a prize and took of her career. Typifying the flapper girl image, Bow enjoyed a life style beyond her means. She tore around Hollywood in a bright red convertible with pet chows dyed to match her flaming red hair. 

Josephine Baker (more photos of Josephine)  Overcoming the limitations imposed by the color of her skin, she became one of the world’s most versatile entertainers, performing on stage, screen and recordings. Josephine was decorated for her undercover work for the French Resistance during World War II. She was a civil rights activist. She refused to perform for segregated audiences and integrated the Las Vegas nightclubs. She adopted twelve children from around the world whom she called her “Rainbow Tribe.”

Josephine Baker (more photos of Josephine)  Overcoming the limitations imposed by the color of her skin, she became one of the world’s most versatile entertainers, performing on stage, screen and recordings. Josephine was decorated for her undercover work for the French Resistance during World War II. She was a civil rights activist. She refused to perform for segregated audiences and integrated the Las Vegas nightclubs. She adopted twelve children from around the world whom she called her “Rainbow Tribe.”

(Source: unitedartists)

More of Martin Munkacsi work.
suddenfabulosity:

“Peignoir in a soft breeze” by Martin Munkácsi. 1936.

More of Martin Munkacsi work.

suddenfabulosity:

“Peignoir in a soft breeze” by Martin Munkácsi. 1936.