Helen Levitt (August 31, 1913 – March 29, 2009), famous for her unique lyrical style of street photography. Tapping into the everyday cultural life of the people on the streets of New York. Levitt produced her most well-recognized work in the 1940s. She was a street photographer. Someone who had an impeccable sense of the pulse of life.

Helen Levitt (August 31, 1913 – March 29, 2009), famous for her unique lyrical style of street photography. Tapping into the everyday cultural life of the people on the streets of New York. Levitt produced her most well-recognized work in the 1940s. She was a street photographer. Someone who had an impeccable sense of the pulse of life.

demiilauren:

“Wanting to be someone else, is a waste of the person you are.”
-Marilyn Monroe

"I just want to be wonderful."
-Marilyn Monroe

demiilauren:

Wanting to be someone else, is a waste of the person you are.”

-Marilyn Monroe

"I just want to be wonderful."

-Marilyn Monroe

(via iamstockholm)

Tango in the East London by Thurston Hopkins, 1954.
Thurston Hopkins is one of the great generation of Picture Post photographers who transformed British photojournalism in the 1950s. In a career spanning four decades, he became known for his acute ability to depict the human condition through images that convey great sensitivity, while taking a creative approach to their sometimes widely varied materia

Tango in the East London by Thurston Hopkins, 1954.

Thurston Hopkins is one of the great generation of Picture Post photographers who transformed British photojournalism in the 1950s. In a career spanning four decades, he became known for his acute ability to depict the human condition through images that convey great sensitivity, while taking a creative approach to their sometimes widely varied materia

(via mudwerks)

Fred Astaire and Audrey Hepburn rehearsing for Funny Face (1957). Photographed by Richard Avedon.

Fred Astaire and Audrey Hepburn rehearsing for Funny Face (1957). Photographed by Richard Avedon.

(via the-absolute-best-posts)

Rock ‘n’ Roll sur les Quais de Paris by Paul Almasy, 1950(?)
The joi de vive of a couple cavorting by the banks of the Sein was captured by Paul Almasy (1906 – 2003),a pioneer of photojournalism. A native of Hungary, Almasy trekked the globe for six decades, amassing 120,000 photos in an exceptionally detailed archive of 20th century history. Stressing content over form in order to educate viewers, Almasy’s photos still exemplify artistic excellence.

Rock ‘n’ Roll sur les Quais de Paris by Paul Almasy, 1950(?)

The joi de vive of a couple cavorting by the banks of the Sein was captured by Paul Almasy (1906 – 2003),a pioneer of photojournalism. A native of Hungary, Almasy trekked the globe for six decades, amassing 120,000 photos in an exceptionally detailed archive of 20th century history. Stressing content over form in order to educate viewers, Almasy’s photos still exemplify artistic excellence.

A prisoner dancing while another plays the guitar at a prison camp by Jack Delano, 1941.
I was interested in people not only as images, but also as human beings. In stories that they would tell me or interviews I had with them. It seemed to be it was an important part of what I was trying to communicate.
oy Stryker hired Delano as an FSA photographer in 1940, and Delano soon became known for his strong compositions and sensitivity to his subjects. Like other FSA photographers, Delano traveled throughout the United States documenting American culture and people while also completing specific assignments (one of his most famous involved the country’s train system). Max Killie next to photo of him in WWI, Heard, Co. was made in 1941, a pivotal year for Delano as he also made his first trip to Puerto Rico (where he would later spend decades working), ended his career with the FSA, and began his wartime service as a military photographer. In addition to photography, Delano composed music. He died in Puerto Rico in 1997.

A prisoner dancing while another plays the guitar at a prison camp by Jack Delano, 1941.

I was interested in people not only as images, but also as human beings. In stories that they would tell me or interviews I had with them. It seemed to be it was an important part of what I was trying to communicate.

oy Stryker hired Delano as an FSA photographer in 1940, and Delano soon became known for his strong compositions and sensitivity to his subjects. Like other FSA photographers, Delano traveled throughout the United States documenting American culture and people while also completing specific assignments (one of his most famous involved the country’s train system). Max Killie next to photo of him in WWI, Heard, Co. was made in 1941, a pivotal year for Delano as he also made his first trip to Puerto Rico (where he would later spend decades working), ended his career with the FSA, and began his wartime service as a military photographer. In addition to photography, Delano composed music. He died in Puerto Rico in 1997.