Le Dragon by Melvin Sokolsky, Paris, 1963
Born 1938 in New York, Melvin Sokolsky (more photos) was a major figure in the revival of fashion photography from the 1960s. He was only 21 when he started working at Harper’s Bazaar for which he produced the “Bubble” series of photographs depicting fashion models floating in giant clear plastic bubbles suspended in midair in Paris.

Le Dragon by Melvin Sokolsky, Paris, 1963

Born 1938 in New York, Melvin Sokolsky (more photos) was a major figure in the revival of fashion photography from the 1960s. He was only 21 when he started working at Harper’s Bazaar for which he produced the “Bubble” series of photographs depicting fashion models floating in giant clear plastic bubbles suspended in midair in Paris.

Bicycle Street by Melvin Sokolsky, Paris 1963
Melvin Sokolsky (more photos)  is one of the great pioneers in the creation of visual imagery. With no formal training, his photographic education came purely from instinct, desire, and careful observation. He took up an all-consuming regimen of photographic experimentation with a singular focus and determination that have since become his trademark process.

Bicycle Street by Melvin Sokolsky, Paris 1963

Melvin Sokolsky (more photos)  is one of the great pioneers in the creation of visual imagery. With no formal training, his photographic education came purely from instinct, desire, and careful observation. He took up an all-consuming regimen of photographic experimentation with a singular focus and determination that have since become his trademark process.

fuckyeahvintagediary:

Photographed by Melvin Sokolsky for Harpers Bazaar Spring 1965.

" Taking a photography is an unspoken conversation in a shared space where the sitter and the maker reveal their being in a kind of silent dance of escalating trust and affinity.”
~~Melvin Sokolsky (more photos)

fuckyeahvintagediary:

Photographed by Melvin Sokolsky for Harpers Bazaar Spring 1965.

" Taking a photography is an unspoken conversation in a shared space where the sitter and the maker reveal their being in a kind of silent dance of escalating trust and affinity.

~~Melvin Sokolsky (more photos)

(Source: journaldelamode)

regardintemporel:

Zdeněk Virt - Nude mirroring in water, 1967

Virt took up photography in the mid—1950s, but won recognition only in the following decade for his images of nudes, manipulating them further through grids and networks. The resulting compositions combined the exactness of science with erotic tension, in which the artist also exploited his earlier training in the graphic arts. 

regardintemporel:

Zdeněk Virt - Nude mirroring in water, 1967

Virt took up photography in the mid—1950s, but won recognition only in the following decade for his images of nudes, manipulating them further through grids and networks. The resulting compositions combined the exactness of science with erotic tension, in which the artist also exploited his earlier training in the graphic arts. 

(via pieces-of-emilie)

Henry Clarke (more of his work) worked with the top models of his time like Suzy Parker, Bettina, and Ann Sainte Marie. With their help Clarke captured the essence of a modern woman - young, carefree, livery and seductive.
He bequeathed his historical collection of photographs to the Musée de la Mode et du Costume in Paris in 1996.

Henry Clarke (more of his work) worked with the top models of his time like Suzy Parker, Bettina, and Ann Sainte Marie. With their help Clarke captured the essence of a modern woman - young, carefree, livery and seductive.

He bequeathed his historical collection of photographs to the Musée de la Mode et du Costume in Paris in 1996.

In 1945, inspired by Cecil Beaton at a photo shoot for Vogue, Henry Clarke (more of his work) borrowed a Rolleiflex camera and began taking pictures. Henry Clarke loved to capture the elegance of women. One of his gifts was “always making women look beautiful”. His images were the epitome of sophistication, with wisps of veil making eyes and lens magic creating more swan-like necks than ever existed.

In 1945, inspired by Cecil Beaton at a photo shoot for Vogue, Henry Clarke (more of his work) borrowed a Rolleiflex camera and began taking pictures. Henry Clarke loved to capture the elegance of women. One of his gifts was “always making women look beautiful”. His images were the epitome of sophistication, with wisps of veil making eyes and lens magic creating more swan-like necks than ever existed.

Henry Clarke (more of his work) was a fabulous fashion photographer of 1950’s and 1960’s. When you think 50’s-60’s elegance you visualize his photos! He worked for American, Frech and British Vouge from 1950’s till late 70’s. Born in Loas Angeles in 1918, Henry Clarke, discovered his calling in 1945 whilst working as an accessorist at Clode Nast in NY. 

Henry Clarke (more of his work) was a fabulous fashion photographer of 1950’s and 1960’s. When you think 50’s-60’s elegance you visualize his photos! He worked for American, Frech and British Vouge from 1950’s till late 70’s. Born in Loas Angeles in 1918, Henry Clarke, discovered his calling in 1945 whilst working as an accessorist at Clode Nast in NY. 

theconstantbuzz:

© Wingate Paine1915-1987


In his day  Wingate Paine created an icon of the 1960s Sexual Revolution. Though innocent by today’s standards, Paine’s photography pushed the limits of what was considered acceptable art photography. Paine viewed his models with appreciation and respect, as well as desire. Paine’s women stand on the threshold of 60s’ feminism. One foot remains in the sexist realm of men (as expressed in the text of Fellini), while the other foot enters a more empowered women’s sphere (given voice by Sagan). 
Paine succeeded in his ambition to produce a modern erotic classic, true to his time.

theconstantbuzz:

© Wingate Paine1915-1987

In his day  Wingate Paine created an icon of the 1960s Sexual Revolution. Though innocent by today’s standards, Paine’s photography pushed the limits of what was considered acceptable art photography. Paine viewed his models with appreciation and respect, as well as desire. Paine’s women stand on the threshold of 60s’ feminism. One foot remains in the sexist realm of men (as expressed in the text of Fellini), while the other foot enters a more empowered women’s sphere (given voice by Sagan). 

Paine succeeded in his ambition to produce a modern erotic classic, true to his time.

theconstantbuzz:

© Wingate Paine 1915-1987

In his day  Wingate Paine created an icon of the 1960s Sexual Revolution. Though innocent by today’s standards, Paine’s photography pushed the limits of what was considered acceptable art photography. Paine viewed his models with appreciation and respect, as well as desire. Paine’s women stand on the threshold of 60s’ feminism. One foot remains in the sexist realm of men (as expressed in the text of Fellini), while the other foot enters a more empowered women’s sphere (given voice by Sagan). 
Paine succeeded in his ambition to produce a modern erotic classic, true to his time.

theconstantbuzz:

© Wingate Paine 1915-1987

In his day  Wingate Paine created an icon of the 1960s Sexual Revolution. Though innocent by today’s standards, Paine’s photography pushed the limits of what was considered acceptable art photography. Paine viewed his models with appreciation and respect, as well as desire. Paine’s women stand on the threshold of 60s’ feminism. One foot remains in the sexist realm of men (as expressed in the text of Fellini), while the other foot enters a more empowered women’s sphere (given voice by Sagan). 

Paine succeeded in his ambition to produce a modern erotic classic, true to his time.

vintagegal:

Marilyn Monroe by Bert Stern 1962.

Bertram Stern (born 3 October 1929) is an American fashion and celebrity portrait photographer. This Marilyn Monroe photo is from Last Sitting photoshoot that was made by Stern and is arguably his best work. They shoot for 3 days and 6 weeks later Marilyn Monroe died.

vintagegal:

Marilyn Monroe by Bert Stern 1962.

Bertram Stern (born 3 October 1929) is an American fashion and celebrity portrait photographer. This Marilyn Monroe photo is from Last Sitting photoshoot that was made by Stern and is arguably his best work. They shoot for 3 days and 6 weeks later Marilyn Monroe died.