Nude behind Cobwebbed Window by Wynn Bullock in 1955.
Wynn Bullock was a consummate practitioner of the craft of photography, using the tools of his trade to express himself with eloquence. He is not easily placed within his chosen field, however, as he kept challenging and redefining the medium.
He reminds me of Francesca Woodman I haven’t really posted much of either of these photographers, but I will in nearest future so do compare and tell me what you think. 

Nude behind Cobwebbed Window by Wynn Bullock in 1955.

Wynn Bullock was a consummate practitioner of the craft of photography, using the tools of his trade to express himself with eloquence. He is not easily placed within his chosen field, however, as he kept challenging and redefining the medium.

He reminds me of Francesca Woodman I haven’t really posted much of either of these photographers, but I will in nearest future so do compare and tell me what you think. 

Henry Clarke (more of his work) worked with the top models of his time like Suzy Parker, Bettina, and Ann Sainte Marie. With their help Clarke captured the essence of a modern woman - young, carefree, livery and seductive.
He bequeathed his historical collection of photographs to the Musée de la Mode et du Costume in Paris in 1996.

Henry Clarke (more of his work) worked with the top models of his time like Suzy Parker, Bettina, and Ann Sainte Marie. With their help Clarke captured the essence of a modern woman - young, carefree, livery and seductive.

He bequeathed his historical collection of photographs to the Musée de la Mode et du Costume in Paris in 1996.

In 1945, inspired by Cecil Beaton at a photo shoot for Vogue, Henry Clarke (more of his work) borrowed a Rolleiflex camera and began taking pictures. Henry Clarke loved to capture the elegance of women. One of his gifts was “always making women look beautiful”. His images were the epitome of sophistication, with wisps of veil making eyes and lens magic creating more swan-like necks than ever existed.

In 1945, inspired by Cecil Beaton at a photo shoot for Vogue, Henry Clarke (more of his work) borrowed a Rolleiflex camera and began taking pictures. Henry Clarke loved to capture the elegance of women. One of his gifts was “always making women look beautiful”. His images were the epitome of sophistication, with wisps of veil making eyes and lens magic creating more swan-like necks than ever existed.

Henry Clarke (more of his work) was a fabulous fashion photographer of 1950’s and 1960’s. When you think 50’s-60’s elegance you visualize his photos! He worked for American, Frech and British Vouge from 1950’s till late 70’s. Born in Loas Angeles in 1918, Henry Clarke, discovered his calling in 1945 whilst working as an accessorist at Clode Nast in NY. 

Henry Clarke (more of his work) was a fabulous fashion photographer of 1950’s and 1960’s. When you think 50’s-60’s elegance you visualize his photos! He worked for American, Frech and British Vouge from 1950’s till late 70’s. Born in Loas Angeles in 1918, Henry Clarke, discovered his calling in 1945 whilst working as an accessorist at Clode Nast in NY. 


London, England1951
Photograph by Robert Frank 

(born November 9, 1924, Zürich, Switzerland) one of the most influential photographers of the mid-20th century, noted for ironic renderings of American life.

Frank became a professional industrial photographer at the age of 22 and in the 1940s became a successful fashion photographer for Harper’s Bazaar magazine in Paris. He felt, however, that the scope of the work was too limited. He abandoned fashion photography about 1948 and went to the United States and then to Peru to explore the expressive possibilities of the 35-mm camera.

London, England
1951

Photograph by Robert Frank 

(born November 9, 1924, Zürich, Switzerland) one of the most influential photographers of the mid-20th century, noted for ironic renderings of American life.


Frank became a professional industrial photographer at the age of 22 and in the 1940s became a successful fashion photographer for Harper’s Bazaar magazine in Paris. He felt, however, that the scope of the work was too limited. He abandoned fashion photography about 1948 and went to the United States and then to Peru to explore the expressive possibilities of the 35-mm camera.

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Teddy Girls by Ken Russell
Elsie Hendon, 15, Jean Rayner, 14, Rosie Hendon, 15, and Mary Toovey on a bombsite in Southam Street, North Kensington, West London.

Teddy Girls, a little-known aspect of the more well-known “Teddy Boy” movement, were working class Londoners, some of them Irish immigrants, who dressed in neo-Edwardian fashions. Today they are little known and little documented; save a lovely photoshoot by Ken Russell, they might have been forgotten entirely. The movement emerged in the late 1940s, as part of the emerging “youth culture” that rose from post-war Britain and America.

Teddy Girls by Ken Russell

Elsie Hendon, 15, Jean Rayner, 14, Rosie Hendon, 15, and Mary Toovey on a bombsite in Southam Street, North Kensington, West London.

Teddy Girls, a little-known aspect of the more well-known “Teddy Boy” movement, were working class Londoners, some of them Irish immigrants, who dressed in neo-Edwardian fashions. Today they are little known and little documented; save a lovely photoshoot by Ken Russell, they might have been forgotten entirely. The movement emerged in the late 1940s, as part of the emerging “youth culture” that rose from post-war Britain and America.

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At several stages of his careerHenry Kenneth Alfred “Ken” Russell (born 3 July 1927) struggled to break into the film industry. Before ‘making it’, Russell enjoyed a brief fling with photography. An exhibition displaying some of Russell’s work was on display during the summer of 2007 in central London’s Proud Galleries in The Strand, London.
The exhibition, entitled Ken Russell’s Lost London Rediscovered: 1951–1957, run until 21 August 2007 and included over fifty limited edition prints from Russell’s personal collection. As implied by the title, the prints displayed were all taken in and around London, with many of the pictures being taken in the Portobello Road area of London.

mudwerks:

(via Marieaunet: Ken Russell - 1954)

At several stages of his careerHenry Kenneth Alfred “Ken” Russell (born 3 July 1927) struggled to break into the film industry. Before ‘making it’, Russell enjoyed a brief fling with photography. An exhibition displaying some of Russell’s work was on display during the summer of 2007 in central London’s Proud Galleries in The Strand, London.

The exhibition, entitled Ken Russell’s Lost London Rediscovered: 1951–1957, run until 21 August 2007 and included over fifty limited edition prints from Russell’s personal collection. As implied by the title, the prints displayed were all taken in and around London, with many of the pictures being taken in the Portobello Road area of London.

mudwerks:

(via Marieaunet: Ken Russell - 1954)

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Tango in the East London by Thurston Hopkins, 1954.
Thurston Hopkins is one of the great generation of Picture Post photographers who transformed British photojournalism in the 1950s. In a career spanning four decades, he became known for his acute ability to depict the human condition through images that convey great sensitivity, while taking a creative approach to their sometimes widely varied materia

Tango in the East London by Thurston Hopkins, 1954.

Thurston Hopkins is one of the great generation of Picture Post photographers who transformed British photojournalism in the 1950s. In a career spanning four decades, he became known for his acute ability to depict the human condition through images that convey great sensitivity, while taking a creative approach to their sometimes widely varied materia

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Jazz Portrait, Harlem 1958
One of the most significant jazz portraits taken in the 20th century, first published in Esquire magazine January 1959; This was Art Kane’s first assignment as a professional photographer. The photo includes some of the big names of Jazz: Art Blakey, Sonny Rollins, Thelonius Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, Count Basie.

Jazz Portrait, Harlem 1958

One of the most significant jazz portraits taken in the 20th century, first published in Esquire magazine January 1959; This was Art Kane’s first assignment as a professional photographer. The photo includes some of the big names of Jazz: Art Blakey, Sonny Rollins, Thelonius Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, Count Basie.

britewings:

Poster from “AMERICA’S FIRST ALL GIRL MOTORCYCLE SHOW” held in September 29th 1940
“Louise Menzer Scherbyn not only was an advocate for women riders but also the organizer for Women’s International Motorcycle Association, (WIMA) the first group that organized women motorcycle enthusiasts outside of local regions, back in the ’50s.”
- demenshea.com

britewings:

Poster from “AMERICA’S FIRST ALL GIRL MOTORCYCLE SHOW” held in September 29th 1940

“Louise Menzer Scherbyn not only was an advocate for women riders but also the organizer for Women’s International Motorcycle Association, (WIMA) the first group that organized women motorcycle enthusiasts outside of local regions, back in the ’50s.”

- demenshea.com

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