vintagegal:

Alla Nazimova

Alla Nazimova was a legend of the Russian and American stages in the early part of the 20st century who went on to star in numerous Hollywood films. As a child, Nazimova studied music at the St. Petersburg Conservatory and at Odessa where she became an excellent violinist. Later she studied acting with Stanislavsky before emigrating to the U.S. in 1905 to work on Broadway where she became one of the best interpreter’s of Ibsen’s work. In 1916, Nazimova made her screen debut. Frequently she would produce and her husband would direct her films. Such collaborative efforts created bold and provocative films that bordered on surrealism. In 1925, Nazimova left films to resume her theatrical career; during the 1940s, she returned to film in character roles. 

vintagegal:

Alla Nazimova

Alla Nazimova was a legend of the Russian and American stages in the early part of the 20st century who went on to star in numerous Hollywood films. As a child, Nazimova studied music at the St. Petersburg Conservatory and at Odessa where she became an excellent violinist. Later she studied acting with Stanislavsky before emigrating to the U.S. in 1905 to work on Broadway where she became one of the best interpreter’s of Ibsen’s work. In 1916, Nazimova made her screen debut. Frequently she would produce and her husband would direct her films. Such collaborative efforts created bold and provocative films that bordered on surrealism. In 1925, Nazimova left films to resume her theatrical career; during the 1940s, she returned to film in character roles. 

Young woman lying on sofa & holding burning cigarette  by Fitz W. Guerin, 1903
Very few women smoked at the turn of the century, because smoking was seen as immoral and a sign of bad character. This was very frustrating to tobacco companies. As George Washington Hill, president of American Tobacco said in 1928, convincing women to smoke “will be like opening a new gold mine in our front yard.” But, tobacco companies dared not advertise to women, for fear of sparking public outcry.
As the 20th century progressed, women began breaking down social and legal barriers. By the late 1920s, tobacco companies decided the time was ripe to take advantage of women’s progress. In 1928, American Tobacco launched its “Reach for a Lucky Instead of a Sweet” campaign to promote Lucky Strikes cigarettes. The ads, which capitalized on the “flapper era’s” new penchant for slenderness, were among the most successful marketing campaigns in history

Young woman lying on sofa & holding burning cigarette  by Fitz W. Guerin, 1903

Very few women smoked at the turn of the century, because smoking was seen as immoral and a sign of bad character. This was very frustrating to tobacco companies. As George Washington Hill, president of American Tobacco said in 1928, convincing women to smoke “will be like opening a new gold mine in our front yard.” But, tobacco companies dared not advertise to women, for fear of sparking public outcry.

As the 20th century progressed, women began breaking down social and legal barriers. By the late 1920s, tobacco companies decided the time was ripe to take advantage of women’s progress. In 1928, American Tobacco launched its “Reach for a Lucky Instead of a Sweet” campaign to promote Lucky Strikes cigarettes. The ads, which capitalized on the “flapper era’s” new penchant for slenderness, were among the most successful marketing campaigns in history

  ”The Lone Pine” by Anne W. Brigman 1908.
This image captures the essence of the Photo-Secession movement which she helped lead. Many of her most famous photos, which were taken between 1900 and 1920 depict nude women in natural contexts. Her work helped to promote photography as a fine art.  The image defies cultural norms accepted conventions, but it is organic and natural at the same time.

  ”The Lone Pine” by Anne W. Brigman 1908.

This image captures the essence of the Photo-Secession movement which she helped lead. Many of her most famous photos, which were taken between 1900 and 1920 depict nude women in natural contexts. Her work helped to promote photography as a fine art.  The image defies cultural norms accepted conventions, but it is organic and natural at the same time.

This is perhaps the most famous (and most comical) still frame from Georges Melies’ 1902 silent film “A Trip to the Moon." Loosely based on From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne and The First Men in the Moon by H.G. Wells, it was the first science fiction film and met great acclaim at the time of its release. The above image portrays the man in the moon, as he watches the astronomers’ capsule approaching him and is subsequently hit in the eye. The sequence in the movie is made comical because the texture of the moon seems to be of cream cheese.

This is perhaps the most famous (and most comical) still frame from Georges Melies’ 1902 silent film “A Trip to the Moon." Loosely based on From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne and The First Men in the Moon by H.G. Wells, it was the first science fiction film and met great acclaim at the time of its release. The above image portrays the man in the moon, as he watches the astronomers’ capsule approaching him and is subsequently hit in the eye. The sequence in the movie is made comical because the texture of the moon seems to be of cream cheese.